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Making the most of the summer holidays


Summer means fun ... great weather, great friends and great times. But it can also be overwhelming, so being strategic about the summer holidays can result in them being a restorative time of the year.
Summer means fun ... great weather, great friends and great times. But it can also be overwhelming, so being strategic about the summer holidays can result in them being a restorative time of the year.

Summer holidays are a special time in Australia. The Christmas rush gives way to long, lazy days with beach trips, barbecues, sunshine and sport. But when the days are long and hot, many people find themselves under a lot of pressure. Our hope is that you can discover your happy place these holidays.


It is common to feel a level of financial anxiety during this supposedly silly season. Some reasons people may feel overwhelmed include additional childcare requirements, extra holiday costs, extensive to-do lists and feeling the need to entertain ‘bored’ kids.


We hear you – summer holidays can be tiresome. But as schedules change and the household mood shifts, this is a perfect time to reassess and reflect on what’s most important in life.


Your usual routine might feel out of whack, so why not change the lens of your outlook, embrace new adventures and connect more deeply with the people in your life? For those with young children, remember you only have 18 summers with your child and this is one of them!


Five tips for a joy-filled holiday

You can take the holiday feeling into the rest of the year!

  1. Keep it simple: It can be tempting to fill holidays with activities, so make sure you leave space to relax and connect with loved ones, neighbours or friends. Work out what’s essential and what to let go. Be intentional about how you spend your money.

  2. Screen-time limitations: Set reasonable expectations about technology use. Holidays are supposed to recharge and promote health, but this could be hampered by too much screen time. Set an example for your family to follow. Some ‘house rules’ could include a 60-minute limit in the morning and no screens between 9am and 4pm.

  3. Socialise: Plan outings to connect with friends, extended relatives or others – suggest meeting for a barbecue, go to a park or plan house visits.

  4. Time and space: It’s okay to ‘just be’. We don’t always need to be entertained. Allow time and space for rest (for everyone!), and create opportunities for creativity, exploration and problem-solving.

  5. Start planning a ‘staycation’: A staycation cuts down on travel expenses. It’s an intentional way to see your hometown through the eyes of a tourist!

  • Think like a tourist: What would you tell friends or family visiting your area to see or do? Ask around for recommendations and search local papers or online for free events coming up.

  • Brainstorm: Make sure activities are affordable and achievable. Some indoor examples include craft activities, board games, baking or pyjama days. Outdoor examples include picnics, bushwalks, bike rides or scavenger hunts.

  • Plan time: Write a list of everything – more than you can do – then plot your staycation!

 

This information is taken from The Salvation Army’s ‘You’re the Boss’ financial assistance booklet. To download the booklet, go to https://www.salvationarmy.org.au/need-help/financial-assistance/youre-the-boss/


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