top of page

A day in the life of ... Major Paul Hateley


Major Paul Hateley’s appointment ensures he has a very full schedule. From left: Senator David Pocock and Major Paul Hateley; Major Paul Hateley, Governor General David Hurley, Linda Hurley, Major Wendy Hateley; Top: Shadow Minister Karen Andrews and Major Paul Hateley; Major Paul Hateley and Commissioners Janine and Robert Donaldson with former Prime Minister Scott Morrison.
Major Paul Hateley’s appointment ensures he has a very full schedule. From left: Senator David Pocock and Major Paul Hateley; Major Paul Hateley, Governor General David Hurley, Linda Hurley, Major Wendy Hateley; Top: Shadow Minister Karen Andrews and Major Paul Hateley; Major Paul Hateley and Commissioners Janine and Robert Donaldson with former Prime Minister Scott Morrison.

Meet Major Paul Hateley, the Head of Government Relations for The Salvation Army in Australia. Based in Canberra, he is frequently seen in the halls of Parliament House and provides pastoral care to MPs and staff, while also advocating for change in social justice policy.

Can you give us an overview of your job? The Head of Government Relations exists to ensure that The Salvation Army has ‘one voice’ to Commonwealth, State and Territory Governments. I manage the relationship between MPs and The Salvation Army and attend meetings with Federal MPs to reinforce that relationship, as well as strengthen the trust and respect built over many decades. The Salvation Army’s Public Relations Secretaries fulfil this responsibility at a State and Territory level.


What does a normal day look like for you? A typical day includes responding to emails (approximately 150 per day!) and letters that range from transcripts and media releases from politicians to meeting requests and clarifications around policy positions. Most days include either formal meetings or conversations with MPs or their staff. We also spend time facilitating policy statements between The Salvation Army and Government.


What is the most challenging aspect of your work? There is an expectation that no Salvation Army personnel approach an MP for a meeting without first liaising with our Government Relations Department. If this does not happen, The Salvation Army representative’s message may be inconsistent with our otherwise stated position, which may erode trust with MPs and diminish our ‘one voice’ to Government.


What would surprise people the most about your work? The volume of connection that The Salvation Army has with MPs, primarily with the purpose of discussing policy and advocating for social justice. Over the past 12 months, we have recorded over 2100 interactions with Federal, State and Territory Governments, including conversations, emails, letters and formal meetings.

How have your many years commissioned as a Salvation Army officer prepared you for this role? I have been a Salvation Army officer for close to 29 years. Whilst the Head of Government Relations is a unique role, most ministry positions within The Salvation Army require the ability to manage and grow complex relationships. This role is no different. My appointments that served communities in multiple states across Australia have given me experiences that are transferable in sharing with MPs. I am blessed to have talented and experienced officers and staff within The Salvation Army that add value to my appointment.

What does it mean to be the hands and feet of Jesus in Parliament House? I always attend Parliament House wearing my Salvation Army uniform. The uniform speaks of availability, credibility, and trust, and it also speaks of our faith ministry. Opportunities arise to be an encourager to MPs and staff, and there are times when it is appropriate to share a prayer or a pastoral word with the MP.


Comments


bottom of page